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Chapter 5: The Colour of the Day (It's Red!)

Updated: Feb 1

I returned to my favourite Warorot Market this past week.

Everywhere I looked, I saw red (and often gold). That doesn't mean I became instantly angry (the idiom meaning). It means Chinese New Year is this coming weekend.


Why red and gold? Well, in the Chinese culture, red symbolizes luck, joy and happiness and gold symbolizes wealth and fortune. So it only makes sense that these are the colours to begin a new year.


Historically, the Chinese began migrating to Thailand in the 13th century and they have continued to do so for centuries, assimilating well into the Thai culture by learning Thai, intermarrying and often taking on Thai names. In other words, the Thai Chinese are a part of what Thailand is, with a strong cultural influence. So, celebrating Chinese New Year is just part of life here.


That being said, there is NO lack of colour in the market. Instead of telling you, I'll just show you in pictures:

Tea anyone? You can buy three of those packets (not the hanging packages) on the bottom row for 100 baht, which is $4.00 Cdn.

Dried fruits and nuts. Many sizes and flavours to choose from. The only one I would NOT recommend is durian!

I'm not sure in what world dried durian would be called "The Best." I've never tried it--I can't get past the smell. In fact, the smell is SO potent, and nasty, that it's banned on certain public transport and many of the hotels put up signs in their lobby saying that durian is not allowed. The smell is so strong I don't think you could sneak it past anyone anyway (although perhaps the dried version would be doable).


What words can I use to describe the rank smell/taste of durian? Well, let me just quote the late Anthony Bourdain, chef and food guru: "Your breath will smell as if you'd been french kissing your dead grandmother." Enough said!


Let me close with one last photo that I took overlooking the stalls in the main market area (this was on a quiet day). I wish I could include all the smells and sounds, the feels and touch, the hustle and noise.

As I walked around, I heard one excited tourist exclaim in staccato form, "This is ab-so-lute-ly amazing!"


She's right. It is.

11 comentários


Convidado:
25 de jan. de 2023

I have eaten durian a number of times and if you get the right one, it really is delicious. As a friend said, the only problem is that you must get it past your nose to eat it.

Curtir

I have tried durian once. We had to take it outside to cut it open. To me it smells like gear oil, which, if you get it on any fabric you cannot totally remove. So gross. I won’t be having it again anytime soon.😊

Curtir
Connie Inglis
Connie Inglis
24 de jan. de 2023
Respondendo a

Gear oil?!!! I LOVE that description. And yes, getting that smell out of your clothes. Nasty! Thanks for sharing your story. It made me laugh this morning.

Curtir

Convidado:
22 de jan. de 2023

Enjoying all your posts! We are also celebrating Chinese New Year in our community group this week. Wearing red and enjoying ethnic foods ( def not durian!) because one in our group is Chinese, and a very dynamic believer! Fun to share this holiday with you.

Curtir

Convidado:
21 de jan. de 2023

What is durian used for? Or just for eating as is?

Curtir

Lovella Soles
Lovella Soles
20 de jan. de 2023

Great photos! I love the durian descriptions!

Curtir
Connie Inglis
Connie Inglis
21 de jan. de 2023
Respondendo a

Hahahaha! Yeah. A great way to describe it. And thanks for commenting.

Curtir

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